Art from Lucy Maliszewski (@lmalis)

 

Lucy Maliszewski (b. 1952, USA)

Years ago while studying Painting at the Art School for the Society of Arts and Crafts in Detroit, one of my instructors gave me some very wise advice. He said to go out each day and see–really see the world–only then are you capable of creating great art. So, on the way to classes, I looked–I saw the lover climbing out the window in the apartment in East Detroit to avoid detection. I saw the burned out homes and businesses lining Warren Avenue remnants of the Detroit Riots. I saw the Vietnam Vet high on Acid hiding behind a lamp post thinking no one could see him. Occasionally, we ventured across the street to the Detroit Institute of Arts for Art History courses. There, I saw the incredible light reflected from ligtning on the gravestone in Jacob Van Ruisdael’s “The Jewish Cemetary”. I saw the energy of light reflected on water in Turner’s paintings and felt the turbulence. I looked at other works and saw much much more. I discovered the Impressionists, the Expressionists, the great masters.Then, I took the same advice about seeing a step further and listened as well – I listened to “Black Anemones” and to “Sparrows” by Joseph Schwatner and then I created my “Sparrow” and Black Anemone in paintings. I I listened to Op. 21 of “Pierrot Lunaire”- Mondestrucken performed by sopranos Lucy Shelton or Tiffany Dumouchelle while looking at Picasso’s work then I painted my own Pierrot.. I looked to the works of the Biomorphic Abstract artists—Arp, Brancusi, Miro, Kadinsky, then Chagall and others and painted and painted. I still try to “See” as I walk by the ocean most mornings. I see cormorants with wings flapping to dry in the cold fall wind. I see pieces of driftwood, fragments of Hurricane Sandy- lives and possessions lost-inspirations found. I see a bicycle found rusted and dripping with sea algae. I see the wind and the waves throwing huge boulders up on the shore. I join them for awhile as they pull me over and under and spit me out and a new work is created.
Graduate-Center for Creative Studies-BFA

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